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REPORT ON THE CURRENT STATE OF THE GLOBAL EQUINE INDUSTRY

Phoebe Norling, Freedom Equine International News.  09:55am, May 30, 2019

Learning anything is like travelling within a maze. If you take a wrong turn, even very early on you will eventually hit a dead end and will be able to go no further unless to back track and get on the right path from where you went wrong.


We are here to say we got to the goal, know the wrong turns and can guide you on that path to get there too.


The global equestrian industry has taken some serious wrong turns as a whole and has set up camp at it's dead end believing this is as far as it goes.


Our job is to get it back to true horsemanship. The path that has no dead ends.

To do this we at Freedom Equine International write tutorials and publish them publicly, run RBEI Courses that take people from complete beginnings to complete advanced and sponsor those who can't afford the Courses.


We sell horses under the Ethical Equine Sellers International Code of Conduct using true horsemanship, provide true horsemanship programmes for the buyers to use to get going on these horses and provide ongoing support and guidance for buyers, clients and horse enthusiasts.


FREEDOM EQUINE INTERNATIONAL: 30 years leading the global revolution of horse mastership into our future of true, simple, kind, effective Relationship Based Equitation from a past of ineffective fear based equine dominance.


Praise for rescue work

Taranaki Daily News, Newspaper Article:  08:25, Jan 19 2011

GUARDIAN ANGEL: Phoebe Colomina with her stallion Genereux.

A former New Plymouth woman has emerged as a one of the heroes of the Queensland flood disaster.


Phoebe Colomina [nee Norling], lives in Minden in south-east Queensland and her actions in saving valuable stallions earned her extensive news coverage in newspapers around Australia including the Sydney Morning Herald.


It had been raining non-stop in Minden, at the bottom of the Lockyer Valley, but soggy puddles turned into a raging torrent and claimed the life of one of their neighbours, a four-year-old boy, Jesse.


"The mares roaming free on their property, Minden Lodge, quickly found their way to higher ground. But Ms Colomina, 35, and her husband Christophe heard the screams of panic from the stallions, trapped in their stable on low ground," the Sydney Morning Herald wrote.


"Rushing into the waist-deep water, which was fast forming a small ocean, they waded past snakes and floating spiders. The horses brayed and screamed as they were being led."


But it was not only their "kids" the Colominas helped that day. Phoebe's husband and another man carried five children from a neighbouring house as flood waters lapped at their second storey.



The family now refers to the Colominas as guardian angels.

Ms Colomina's mother, Patricia Norling, still lives in New Plymouth and was proud of her daughter.


"Phoebe's lived there for five years now, and while we were concerned when the floods first started, she was quick to assure me she would be all right.


"Ever since she left school she has worked with horses and she used to ride horses for Alan Sharrock, so there was no way she would ever let anything happen to them. "I am very proud of her, she's a great girl."


Attempts by the Taranaki Daily News to speak to Ms Colomina were unsuccessful.


Taranaki Daily News

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Blood-curdling screams

from panicked stallions

The Sydney Morning Herald.  News Article.  
By Josephine Tovey January 17, 2011 — 3.00am

WHEN a horse is in trouble it doesn't just whinny, it screams.

It was a sound Phoebe Colomina heard over and over again as the stables where her valuable stallions were kept disappeared fast under water last Tuesday. ''They're usually gentle creatures,'' she said. ''It's bloodcurdling.''

It had been raining non-stop but few in the picturesque town of Minden, at the bottom of the Lockyer Valley, were prepared for the soggy puddles to turn into a raging torrent as it did that day. It would claim the life of one of their neighbours, a four-year-old boy, Jesse.


The mares roaming free on their property, Minden Lodge, quickly found their way to higher ground. But Ms Colomina and her husband Christophe heard the screams of panic from the stallions, trapped in their stable on low ground. Rushing into the waist-deep water, which was fast forming a small ocean, they waded past snakes and floating spiders. The horses brayed and screamed as they were being led.


It was a daring act that might puzzle some in the city, but in this horse-breeding area, it was a no-brainer. ''Our horses are our kids,'' she said. ''We would die before they did.''

But it was not only their ''kids'' the Colominas helped that day. At the bottom of their property Amber Hartley and her five children, aged four to 17, and one of their friends, were watching from the upper floor of their house as the waters crept higher and higher.


Ms Hartley, who had moved to the town only six weeks earlier, became increasingly fearful the second storey would be inundated too. Though she had not had time to get to know her neighbours, Mr Colomina and another man were soon at her door, carrying her younger children on their backs up the hill to safety.


As the waist-deep water swirled around them, Ms Hartley's daughter Chloe, 17, became paralysed by fear.


Without hesitation, her brother Jamie, 13, scooped her up and over his shoulders and carried her up the hill. ''The waters were so strong, if you stopped you could feel yourself losing your balance,'' she said. The family now refers to its neighbours as guardian angels.


Later, when Ms Hartley saw the rescue helicopters searching for the missing Jesse, she felt in even greater debt to her neighbours. ''In my couple of moments I kept thinking that could have been my four-year-old,'' she said.



The Sydney Morning Herald

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